Make 200 ft $170.00 of Beveled Scale Homasote Roadbed from 1- $26.00 4X8 sheet of Homasote

Rio Grande Dan's picture

Ten years ago I found this following web site that explains how to cut and make your own Homasote roadbed.

The main tool required is a Table saw and if you don't have access to one that's OK check out the web site anyway as there is tons of great information on Layout Construction by Craig Bisgeier and the Housatonic Railroad Company.

This is Not a site that sells product it just tells you how to build models and bench work as well as a great Model Railroad Craig has built.

On this site is literally Tons of helpful FREE How to projects from building your own turntable, Casting Car sides and body's, building bench work and painting back drops To my all time favorite making $170.00 of Homasote roadbed from a single 4 X 8 sheet of Homasote.

The make your own Homasote step by step Web pages are at  --  http://www.housatonicrr.com/DIY_Roadbed.htm

Craigs Main site with tons of free helpful hints  --  http://www.housatonicrr.com/Index.htm

I know somebody will find this information as useful as I did.

Rio Grande Dan




Craig has some great info

I really like listening to Craig on the MRH sponsor Model Railcast.  His 10 Commandments for a Yard are a must read.

Steve

Scarpia's picture

Thanks Dan

Thanks Dan, I'm pretty sure that's where I got the idea to cut the thickness down of the homasote, not to mention the beveled edges.


HO, early transition era www.garbo.org/MRR local time GMT +4

 

bear creek's picture

How many cubic feet of gray

How many cubic feet of gray dust do you get from ripping a sheet of homasote into roadbed?

Charlie

 Contributing Editor, Model Railroad Hobbyist magazine

Scarpia's picture

How many cubic feet of gray

How many cubic feet of gray dust do you get from ripping a sheet of homasote into roadbed?

From my experience, I'd hazard around 3200 cubic feet of gray "dust" (fluffier than dust though, more like a gray paper snow).

 


HO, early transition era www.garbo.org/MRR local time GMT +4

 

tetters's picture

Speaking from experience... 

Speaking from experience...  a lot.  I remember ripping up my roadbed and glad I did it outside in my driveway.  I almost filled up my blue recycling bin with the what I swept up once I was done.  I followed Craig's instructions on his website too.

All that said, I prefer Homasote for hand laying track.  Call me a dinosaur or throwback, but I love spiking track.

See where you are going with your comment though.  It does seem like an incredible waste of material.

      

 Shane T.

 

Dust

I don't see what the big deal is.  OK, so you create a bunch of dust once a year, so what?  Its not like you are scattering radioactive waste around the neighborhood.  Normally when I've cut Homasote spline or roadbed we've done several sheets at a time so we've made enough material for a year or two's worth of layout building.

A saw kerf is a saw kerf.  Whether you are ripping hardboard into 1/2" strips or ripping Homasote into 2" strips, the kerfs are the same width so "waste" the same amount of material.  Its just that Homasote dust is fluffier so looks like there is more.

If you are really frugal, you could use the Homasote dust in place of Celluclay in ground goop.

Dave Husman

Modeling the Wilmington & Northern Branch in 1900-1905

Iron men and wooden cars.

I remember a scenery material that was quite a rage 30 years ago

When I first got into the hobby in the 1980's I remember articles in the magazines suggesting using a 50/50 mix of Portland cement and paper to make hard shell.  It was supposed to be much lighter in weight than the typical hydrocal plaster hardshell material that was popular at the time.  I'm wondering if homosote dust could be mixed with cement to make hardshell?

Greyhart's picture

Or Perhaps...

Maybe dye it green and use it as ground foam?

 

 Ken Biles

My First Model Railroad

 

 

 

 

Geared Steam's picture

I think the guys were just

joking about it and not really making a big deal of it.

EDIT:After reading another thread concerning Homasote, I retract my statement. wink

Hardshell

I have a Kalmbach layout building book from the late 50's or early 60's my dad bought me when I started that suggests that asbestos shorts should be mixed into the plaster mix for scenery to make it stronger.

Funny, I haven't seen that advice in the magazines lately.......

Dave Husman

Modeling the Wilmington & Northern Branch in 1900-1905

Iron men and wooden cars.


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